Interview with Jo Moss, Fellow Sea Glass Collector

Rainbow of sea glass treasures from the Thames Estuary.

I met Jo through Instagram and we've kept in touch ever since. We've been sharing sea glass ideas and our best finds, building a great friendship though our love of beach treasure.

I recently quizzed Jo about her sea glass passion and here's what she had to say. Enjoy!​


Sea glass hunting on Seaham Hall beach, England.

I'm in the green coat.

How long have have you been collecting sea glass?

I started collecting about 14 years ago while on holiday in Cornwall in the UK. But after several house moves, my first small collection got mislaid and I started properly again about 4 years ago. I am now a serious collector!

How did you start collecting?

I was on holiday at a seaside village called Mousehole in Cornwall, UK and I was walking around the harbour at low tide. I couldn't believe the tiny jewels just laying on the sand. Most of the glass was cobalt blue and reminded me of sapphires in the sun. I just had to have them!

What is it you love about sea glass hunting?

Apart from the joy of walking on beaches, there's a huge thrill in finding that special piece. You never know what's out there waiting to be found.

Do you have a favorite beachcombing memory?

I'd read about a famous Victorian dump beach on the south coast of England in Dorset. We visited while on holiday last year and there was so much glass, I had to be very selective as I couldn't carry any more! Then my daughter and I found our first beautiful glass stopper. I actually screamed and did a huge jump in the air!

Do you have a favourite beachcombed item that you collected on the beach?

This has to be my almost intact Murano glass pig ornament I found half buried on the beaches of the River Thames in Essex. It's huge and has such beautiful glass patterns inside.

Murano sea glass pig found at Thames River foreshore, England.

Here's the Murano pig I found, along with an image of an original.

Do you have some favorite places to collect sea glass?

My local places I visit are around the Suffolk coast are between Harwich and Felixstowe which are big international ports. I often find lots of interesting pieces here. The rest of the Suffolk coast is quite poor for sea glass unfortunately.

Other fabulous places to visit are the mud and shingle beaches of the Thames Estuary in Essex, the Jurassic Coast in Dorset (which has so much fabulous glass and fossils) and, of course, the best sea glass beach of all at Seaham, England. You find wonderful glass, the locals are lovely and it never disappoints.

An antique sea glass bottle base from Suffolk.

An antique bottle base from Suffolk.

Do you have a dream location where you would like to beachcomb?

My dream sea glassing location would have to be Davenport, California with all that beautiful art glass although it looks so dangerous avoiding those huge waves!

My safer choice would be the hot sunny beaches of Puerto Rico - or any other Caribbean Island to be fair! Also, if I ever get the chance, I would love to visit the East and West coasts of Scotland. It's supposed to be great for sea glass hunting.

Have you created anything with your sea glass collection?

I filled a heart shaped photo frame full of Seaham glass which looks really cool. I wish I knew how to make jewellery as I'd be doing that all the time.

Do you buy handmade sea glass items from other makers?

I buy jewellery from the very talented ladies at Seaham as they make such wonderful items.

How can other sea glass collectors get in contact with you?

Please come find me on Etsy, Facebook or Instagram.


Thanks so much to Jo for taking time out to talk to me. Go check out her pages!


Jonna

Jonna

I have been gathering sea glass for many years. I can never resist a stroll along the beach and the opportunity to add some more beach treasure to my collection!

2 Comments

  1. I love that sea glass pig! How fantastic to find something like that <3
    (I'm Paula in the bright blue coat with Jo)

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